Note: These reports are made available to the public for research and educational purposes only: they must not be used for other purposes. Some of these reports are more than 20 years old, and could contain some information that is not up to date. To read the executive summary or to download the complete report in PDF format, simply click on the proper link.


NOISE ISOLATION PROVIDED BY FLOOR/CEILING ASSEMBLIES IN WOOD CONSTRUCTION
MJM Acoustical Consultants Inc., Montreal, February 1989, Revised April 1990.

A research project conducted in the acoustical laboratory of the National Research Council of Canada, on behalf of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The objective of this research was to determine the acoustical performance of various types of ceiling materials and installations and of several sound absorptive materials used to build floor/ceiling assemblies in wood construction; the report is available in both French and English.

                                            



SOUND TRANSMISSION THROUGH WOOD JOIST FLOOR/CEILING SYSTEMS: A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF SOUND ABSORBING MATERIALS AND CHANGES TO THE CEILING STRUCTURE
A.C.C Warnock (National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario) and M.J.Morin (MJM Acoustical Consultants inc., Montreal, Quebec), Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Volume 88 - Issue S1, P.S134 (1990)

During a study funded by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, undertaken by MJM Acoustical Consultants*, a wood joist floor system was constructed in the Acoustical Laboratory at NRC. Measurements of airborne and impact sound transmission were made for different types and amounts of sound absorbing material in the cavity. Differences between materials were small. Different makes of resilient metal channels were installed; all gave about the same results. Methods of improving an unsatisfactory floor were examined. Over 20 floor systems were measured. Measurements were made down to 63 Hz and revealed that in many cases there are resonances occurring below 125 Hz that have a strong influence on transmission loss values at and above 125 Hz. While the causes of the resonances are not always clear, measurements to these low frequencies give a clearer picture of the effect of changes due to the structure. This article gives a summary of the results obtained; it is available only in English.

*Noise Isolation Provided by Floor/Ceiling Assemblies in Wood Construction, MJM Acoustical Consultants Inc., Montreal, Feb. 1989, Revised April 1990

                                     



PLUMBING NOISE IN MULTI-DWELLING BUILDINGS
MJM Acoustical Consultants Inc., Montreal, September 1990.

A research project conducted in the acoustical laboratory of the National Research Council of Canada, on behalf of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The objective of this research was to determine the acoustical performance of various pipes and plumbing installations; the report is available in both French and English.

                                           



REDUCTION OF PLUMBING NOISE IN LIGHTWEIGHT CONSTRUCTION
A.C.C Warnock (National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario) and M.J.Morin (MJM Acoustical Consultants inc., Montreal, Quebec), Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Volume 88 - Issue S1, P.S135 (1990)

Noise from plumbing fixtures can be a source of great annoyance in single-family and multi-family homes. Noise-control articles and textbooks usually recommend the use of resilient supports for pipes and other fixtures as a means of controlling noise. A study funded by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation and undertaken by MJM Acoustical Consultants* at NRC examined the changes in noise level produced by different types of pipes, different methods of mounting pipes, different wall types, and the addition of sound absorbing materials in walls. Noise sources used included an ISO standard plumbing noise source, a toilet, a sink, and five common bathroom faucets. Closed cell rubber foam supports were found to be the most effective of the resilient materials tested, providing reductions in A-weighted noise levels around 20 dB. This article gives a summary of the results obtained; it is available only in English.

*Plumbing Noise in Multi-Dwelling Buildings, MJM Acoustical Consultants Inc., Montreal, Sept. 1990

                                  



RESEARCH PROJECT TO PROPOSE AND VALIDATE A METHOD TO MEASURE THE SOUND POWER LEVELS GENERATED BY FANS IN FIELD CONDITIONS
MJM Acoustical Consultants Inc., Montreal, September 1991.

A research project conducted in the acoustical laboratory of the National Research Council of Canada, on behalf of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. This project was a first attempt to validate a procedure using intensimetry to field measure the noise generated by fans; the report is available only in English.

                                           



NOISE ISOLATION PROVIDED BY ACCESS DOORS IN MULTI-DWELLING BUILDINGS
MJM Acoustical Consultants Inc., Montreal, February 1993.

A research project conducted in the acoustical laboratory of Concordia University, on behalf of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The objective of this research was to test the acoustical performance of various types of doors and sound gaskets; the report is available only in English.

                                           



RÉDUCTION DU BRUIT PRODUIT PAR LES PORTES DE GARAGE
MJM Acoustical Consultants Inc., Montreal, June 1994.

A research project conducted in field conditions, on behalf of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The objective of this research was to determine the efficiency of different economical noise and vibration control devices which can be incoporated to garage doors to silence their operation. An executive summary was produced by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation in both French and English. The research report is available only in French.

             



QUALIFICATION DU DEGRÉ DE CONFORT ACOUSTIQUE PROCURÉ PAR LES IMMEUBLES MULTILOGEMENTS - PHASE I
MJM Acoustical Consultants Inc., Montreal, July 1996.

A research project subsidized by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The objective of the first phase of this research was to set forth noise control criteria and to develop a procedure for evaluating the degree of acoustic comfort provided in multi-family structures. The executive summary is available in English but the full report of this research is available only in French.

                                   

 

QUALIFICATION OF THE DEGREE OF ACOUSTIC COMFORT PROVIDED BY MULTI-DWELLING BUILDINGS - PHASE II
MJM Acoustical Consultants Inc., Montreal, December 2002.

A research project subsidized by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. In Phase ll of this research, the noise isolation criteria set forth during Phase l are validated using on site measurements, and a procedure for evaluating the degree of acoustic comfort provided in units in multi-family structures is proposed; the report is available in both French and English. During the English translation in 2012, its content has been revised.

                                         

 

NOISE ISOLATION PROVIDED BY WINDOWS IN RESIDENTIAL PROJECTS
MJM Acoustical Consultants Inc., Montreal, March 1997.

A research project conducted in the acoustical laboratory of the Domtar Research Center on behalf of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The objective of this research was to test the acoustical performance provided by various types of fixed and operable windows in residential projects; the report is available in both French and English.

                                            



NOISE ISOLATION PROVIDED BY EXTERIOR WALLS IN WOOD CONSTRUCTION
MJM Acoustical Consultants Inc., Montreal, October 1998.

A research project conducted in the acoustical laboratory of the Domtar Research Center on behalf of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The objective of this research was to determine the sound attenuation properties of the most popular exterior walls in low and medium cost residential wood constructions in Canada; the report is available only in English.

                                          



NOISE PRODUCED BY DWV PIPES MADE OF CAST IRON, PVC AND ABS
MJM Acoustical Consultants inc., Montreal, July 2001.

A research project conducted in the acoustical laboratory of the Domtar Research Center on behalf of the Cast Iron and Soil Pipe Association. The objective of this research was to characterize and compare the noise produced by water flowing inside DWV pipes made of CAST IRON, ABS and PVC pipes. All the tests were conducted in the same experimental conditions which allows to directly compare the acoustical performance of the different pipes tested.  An executive summary was produced by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation in both French and English. The research report is available only in English.

                                            



NOISE ISOLATION PROVIDED BY GYPSUM BOARD PARTITIONS
MJM Acoustical Consultants inc., Montreal, January 2002.

MJM was commissioned by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to analyze and compare the results of over 350 sound transmission loss tests conducted on a wide variety of partitions constructed with gypsum board, tested in the acoustical laboratories of the National Research Council of Canada. The results of these measurements were first published in IRC internal reports no IRC-IR-693 and no 761.  The research report produced by MJM ACOUSTICAL CONSULTANTS INC. is available in both French and English.

                                            



ASSESSING THE FIELD IMPACT SOUND INSULATION PROVIDED BY FLOOR COVERINGS IN CONCRETE CONDOMINIUM BUILDINGS
Michel Morin, MJM Acoustical Consultants inc., Journal of the Canadian Acoustical Association, June 2009, Volume 37 - Number 2, P.21 to 24

Several regulations and co-property acts allow condominium owners to install hard floor coverings provided that a minimum impact sound isolation rating is achieved. Many construction professionnls recommend such surfaces based on tests performed using the procedures described in ASTM E 492 or ASTM E 1007. During the present study, thirty-five bare concrete slabs with thicknesses ranging from 200 to 250 mm (8 to 10 in.) were randomly tested in different buildings in Montreal using the procedures outlined in ASTM E 1007. The large variations noted in the measured NISPLs and FIIC ratings suggest that the results of tests made in strict conformance with ASTM E 1007 are anecdotal and cannot be used by acousticians and construction professionals to predict the impact noise isolation provided by a floor covering installed on a "typical" 200 mm (8 in.) to 250 mm (10 in.) thick concrete slab. This paper presents the results of these measurements and proposes a statistical approach to predict the probability that a floor installed on a typical 200 to 250 mm thick concrete slab will achieve the noise isolation target set forth in the regulation, or in the co-property act (usually FIIC 55 in Canada and FIIC 50 in USA).

                                       


ÉTUDE DE CAS: AMÉLIORATION DE LA PERFORMANCE ACOUSTIQUE D'UNE CLOISON INTERLOGEMENTS EXISTANTE
MJM Acoustical Consultants inc., Montreal, 2007.

In this case study subsidized by CMHC, the author describes several construction techniques and materials used in an attempt to improve the sound isolation provided by an interdwelling partition. Some interventions were made with specialized "acoustical" materials. This case study demonstrates that the use of such "acoustical" materials does not necessarily provide better results,and that one can improve the sound isolation provided by a partition using standard material and simple construction techniques. Also discussed in this article is a simple method to improve the sound isolation provided by a floor/ceiling assembly in wood construction based on the results of tests conducted during a research project subsidized by the CMHC, which was undertaken by MJM ACOUSTICAL CONSULTANTS INC. in the acoustical laboratory of the NRC. This article is available only in French.